Uncertainty 3

Heisenberg’s Uncertainty Principle says that the more accurately the position of a particle is known, the less accurately the momentum of the particle is known, and vice-versa. The accuracy of these two properties at the same time is limited. One can be very accurate but only at the expense of the other property’s accuracy.

Lets use a rough example. The faster you go (momentum), the less accurate your GPS is (position). GPS aside, the effect is even greater on a Human scale.

When we’re in an airplane, we know exactly where we’re going (momentum), but we don’t know exactly where we are (position), “Somewhere over the United States” or “Somewhere over the Atlantic”, or wherever. We can approximate the general geographic area based on the length of the flight, but we’re only accurate within a few hundred miles.

When you arrive at the airport, you know exactly where you are, but your momentum is slowed, there is more resistance with every move, your direction and speed change often. There are elevators, foot traffic, lines, stop lights, turns, loops, etc. Your momentum hits resistance everywhere and is always stoping, going, turning, changing, but you know exactly where you are in any moment.

Next, we’ll explore how to use this knowledge in our own lives to make better decisions that lead us to the future we desire.